React toggle group component

Jan 20, 2023

At first glance, the toggle group is just buttons smooshed together. But making those buttons keyboard accessible following the radio group ARIA pattern is the tricky part.

In this post, we will

  1. create a component API with basic mouse interactivity
  2. introduce and implement a roving tabindex with keyboard shortcuts
  3. and cap it all off by talking through the ARIA guidelines.

Here's what we are making:

import { useState } from "react";

import { ToggleGroup } from "./toggle-group"

export default function App() {
    const [favoriteFruit, changeFavoriteFruit] = useState<string | null>("banana")

    return (
        <div className="flex h-screen justify-center items-center">
            <ToggleGroup.Root
                value={favoriteFruit}
                onChange={changeFavoriteFruit}
                aria-label="What is your favorite fruit?"
            >
                <ToggleGroup.Button value="strawberry" className="px-2">
                    Strawberry 🍓
                </ToggleGroup.Button>
                <ToggleGroup.Button value="banana" className="px-2">
                    Banana 🍌
                </ToggleGroup.Button>
                <ToggleGroup.Button value="apple" className="px-2">
                    Apple 🍏
                </ToggleGroup.Button>
            </ToggleGroup.Root>
        </div>
    )
}

Component API

The toggle group is a visual variant of the radio group pattern.

A visual comparison of a Radio group versus a Toggle group

It is a great single-click alternative to the combobox and should be used when there are few enough selectable options. I'll be making it a controlled component so that it can be used in forms and toolbars.

The API should be composable with other primitives from my UI kit, so I'll break it down into Root and Button sub-components.

We are creating a ToggleGroup like the first option:

<Root
    value={favoriteFruit}
    onChange={changeFavoriteFruit}
    aria-label="What is your favorite?"
>
    <Button value="one" className="px-2">
        Strawberry 🍓
    </Button>
    <Button value="two" className="px-2">
        Banana 🍌
    </Button>
    <Button value="three" className="px-2">
        Apple 🍏
    </Button>
</Root>
<ToggleGroup
    value={favoriteFruit}
    onChange={changeFavoriteFruit}
    options={[
        {
            value: 'strawberry',
            label: 'Strawberry 🍓'
        },
        {
            value: 'banana',
             label: 'Banana 🍌'
        },
        {
            value: 'apple',
            label: 'Apple 🍏'
        },
    ]}
    buttonClassName="px-2"
    aria-label="What is your favorite?"
/>

There is nothing wrong with the second API option, but it's not composable. Imagine someone was trying to use our ToggleGroup with icon buttons. Now they have to extend it to take an aria-label in the options array.

We can avoid problems like this one by keeping our API open.

Creating the Root component

Our Root component doesn't hold the state of our input but it will pass it along nicely with context.

const ToggleGroupContext = createContext<{
    value: string | null
    onChange: (value: string) => void
}>({
    value: null,
    onChange: () => {},
})

With context created, we can make the Root component render the context provider and spread all other props onto the <div /> that is wrapping our children.

type RootBaseProps = {
    children: ReactNode | ReactNode[]
    value: string | null
    onChange: (value: string) => void
}

type RootProps = RootBaseProps & Omit<ComponentPropsWithoutRef<'div'>, keyof RootBaseProps>

export function Root({ value, onChange, children, ...props }: RootProps) {
    const providerValue = useMemo(
        () => ({
            value,
            onChange,
        }),
        [value, onChange],
    )
    return (
        <ToggleGroupContext.Provider value={providerValue}>
            <div {...props}>{children}</div>
        </ToggleGroupContext.Provider>
    )
}

ComponentPropsWithoutRef is a generic TS type that ship with React. ComponentPropsWithoutRef<'div'> represents all the props that a <div /> expects. It is great for typing components where the props are spread onto an element.

If you redefine any of keys from ComponentPropsWithoutRef you might get a type mismatch. To work around this I am Omiting the keys of RootBaseProps from ComponentPropsWithoutRef before creating the intersection type.

For more info on ComponentPropsWithoutRef I found this blog post helpful ↗

Creating the Button component

Ok onto the Button — the consumer of our context.

type ToggleGroupButtonBaseProps = {
    className?: string
    value: string
    children: ReactNode
}

type ToggleGroupButtonProps = ToggleGroupButtonBaseProps &
    Omit<ComponentPropsWithoutRef<'button'>, keyof ToggleGroupButtonBaseProps>

export function Button({ children, value, className, ...props }: ToggleGroupButtonProps) {
    const { value: selectedValue, onChange } = useContext(ToggleGroupContext)

    return (
        <button
            className={clsx(
                className,
                'bg-slate-200 p-1 first:rounded-l last:rounded-r hover:bg-slate-300 outline-none border-2 border-transparent focus:border-slate-400',
                selectedValue === value && 'bg-slate-300',
            )}
            onClick={e => {
                onChange(value)
                props.onClick?.(e)
            }}
        >
            {children}
        </button>
    )
}
  1. We use the BaseProps + ComponentPropsWithoutRef type combo to type our component like a <button />.

    type ToggleGroupButtonBaseProps = {
        className?: string
        value: string
        children: ReactNode
    }
    
    type ToggleGroupButtonProps = ToggleGroupButtonBaseProps &
        Omit<ComponentPropsWithoutRef<'button'>, keyof ToggleGroupButtonBaseProps>
    
  2. We then consume the context for the selectedValue and onChange.

    const { value: selectedValue, onChange } = useContext(ToggleGroupContext)
    
  3. We add some styles.

    • bg-slate-200 p-1 for base background color and padding
    • first:rounded-l last:rounded-r to round the first and last <button />s
    • hover:bg-slate-300 to add a hover state
    • selectedValue === value && 'bg-slate-300' to add a selected state
  4. We disabled the default focus in favor of a border alternative outline-none border-2 border-transparent focus:border-slate-400.

    I mainly did this because the elements are adjacent to each other, which causes some outline clipping.

    Image of default focus ring being visually cut off

    Note: I set a border width (border-2) and make it transparent (border-transparent) so that there is no resizing when the element is focused.

  5. And finally we add an event handler for onClick of each Button to trigger the onChange of our ToggleGroup.

    onClick={(e) => {
        onChange(value)
    }}
    

Just like that — our ToggleGroup works with the mouse.

import { useState } from "react";

import { ToggleGroup } from "./toggle-group"

export default function App() {
    const [favoriteFruit, changeFavoriteFruit] = useState<string | null>("banana")

    return (
        <div className="flex h-screen justify-center items-center">
            <ToggleGroup.Root
                value={favoriteFruit}
                onChange={changeFavoriteFruit}
                aria-label="What is your favorite fruit?"
            >
                <ToggleGroup.Button value="strawberry" className="px-2">
                    Strawberry 🍓
                </ToggleGroup.Button>
                <ToggleGroup.Button value="banana" className="px-2">
                    Banana 🍌
                </ToggleGroup.Button>
                <ToggleGroup.Button value="apple" className="px-2">
                    Apple 🍏
                </ToggleGroup.Button>
            </ToggleGroup.Root>
        </div>
    )
}

Keyboard shortcut concepts

Before we jump into implementing our keyboard shortcuts, I want to pose some questions that will ensure we are on the same page.

What are the different selection types?

  1. The first type of selection is "selection follows focus":

    As the user traverses the toggle group focus and selection move together.

  2. The other type of selection is distinct from focus:

    Focus is controlled with arrows (and other keys based on what pattern you are following), and selection is controlled with space.

What ARIA pattern does the ToggleGroup follow?

The toggle group follows the radio group pattern, which means that — aside from usage within a toolbar — its selection follows focus.

Don't be confused by incorrect implementations out there. I didn't end up finding a correct one :P

  • The Radix toggle group has distinct focus/selection regardless of whether it is in a toolbar or not.
  • The Ant Design toggle group has selection follow focus on arrow key, but also allows you to jump between different toggle groups without using tab.
  • and Material UI's toggle group just treats the component as a group of <button/>s.

What shortcuts will we be implementing?

These are coming straight from the documentation of the radio group pattern.

  • up / left arrows should move focus/selection to the previous button
  • down / right arrows should move focus/selection to the next button
  • space should select the focused element if it isn't already selected
  • tab / shift+tab should select the first value unless a value is already specified

Keyboard shortcut implementation

To create keyboard shortcuts for next button and previous button we need to know the order our buttons are rendered. If we had chosen API option two with an options prop like this -> options=[{value: 'strawberry', label: 'Strawberry 🍓'}, ...], then we would have such an order.

Instead, we will have to get this data from the DOM. If we know the order of elements in the DOM and which values correspond to each element, we can derive the order of values.

We will accomplish this by

  1. creating a map of values to elements
  2. getting the order of elements in the DOM
  3. and sorting a list of values based on the element order.

Creating a map of values to elements

The first step is associating DOM elements with values in our toggle group.

export function ToggleGroup({ value, onChange, children, ...props }: ToggleGroupProps) {
+    const elements = useRef<Map<string, HTMLElement>>(new Map())
    const providerValue = useMemo(
        () => ({
            value,
            onChange,
+            register: function (value: string, element: HTMLElement) {
+                elements.current.set(value, element)
+            },
+            deregister: function (value: string) {
+                elements.current.delete(value)
+            },
        }),
        [value, onChange],
    )
    return (
        <ToggleGroupContext.Provider value={providerValue}>
            <div {...props}>{children}</div>
        </ToggleGroupContext.Provider>
    )
}
  1. We create a mapping of value to element

    const elements = useRef<Map<string, HTMLElement>>(new Map())
    

    This state is only used in event handlers and shouldn't cause rerenders so useRef is perfect.

  2. We create some callbacks for the Buttons to register with their Root

    register: function (value: string, element: HTMLElement) {
        elements.current.set(value, element)
    },
    deregister: function (value: string) {
        elements.current.delete(value)
    },
    
  3. And then in our Button component we use a callback ref to update the mapping

    <button
    +    ref={(element: HTMLElement | null) => {
    +        element != null ? register(value, element) : deregister(value)
    +    }}
        {/* ... */}
    >
    

    Since callback refs are called with null between value changes, this code will deregister before it reregisters again with a new element.

Getting the order of elements and sorting our list of values

When reading Radix's implementation of a roving tabindex I found that they query based on a data attribute. I'll be adding a similar data attribute to the Button.

<button
+    data-toggle-group-button
>

Now I can query the ref of the wrapper element in my Root for that data attribute.

export function ToggleGroup({ value, onChange, children, ...props }: ToggleGroupProps) {
    const elements = useRef<Map<string, HTMLElement>>(new Map())
+    const ref = useRef<HTMLDivElement | null>(null)

+    const getOrderedItems = useCallback(() => {
+        if (!ref.current) return []

        // query DOM elements by the data attribute from the `Root`
+        const domElements = Array.from(ref.current.querySelectorAll('[data-toggle-group-button]'))

        // sort an array of {value, element} pairs (Items)
+        return Array.from(elements.current)
+            .sort((a, b) => domElements.indexOf(a[1]) - domElements.indexOf(b[1]))
+            .map(([value, element]) => ({ value, element }))
+    }, [])

    const providerValue = useMemo(
        () => ({
+           getOrderedItems
        }),
-        [value, onChange],
+        [value, onChange, getOrderedItems],
    )
    return (
        <ToggleGroupContext.Provider value={providerValue}>
-            <div {...props}>
+            <div ref={ref} {...props}>
                {children}
            </div>
        </ToggleGroupContext.Provider>
    )
}
  1. We create a new callback for getting an ordered list of items

    const getOrderedItems = useCallback(() => {
        /* ... */
    }, [])
    

    Items here is what I am referring to an object with a value and it's related element.

    type Item = { value: string; element: HTMLElement }
    
  2. In that callback we can query the Buttons within our Root

    const domElements = Array.from(ref.current.querySelectorAll('[data-toggle-group-button]'))
    
  3. And then derive the order of Items from the order of elements in the DOM.

    return Array.from(elements.current)
        .sort((a, b) => domElements.indexOf(a[1]) - domElements.indexOf(b[1]))
        .map(([value, element]) => ({ value, element }))
    

Creating the next button keyboard shortcut

Jumping back into the Button I can now add an onKeyDown event handler to trigger navigation.

function Button(/* ... */) {
    const {
+        getOrderedItems,
    } = useContext(ToggleGroupContext)

    return (
        <button
+            onKeyDown={(e) => {
+                const items = getOrderedItems()
+                let nextItem: Item | undefined
+                const currIndex = items.findIndex(item => item.value === value)
+
+                if (currIndex === -1) {
+                    nextItem = items.shift()
+                } else if (isHotkey(['down', 'right'], e)) {
+                    nextItem = currIndex === items.length - 1 ? items[0] : items[currIndex + 1]
+                }
+
+                if (nextItem) {
+                    nextItem.element.focus()
+                    onChange(nextItem.value)
+                }
+            }}
        >
        {/* ... */}
  1. We get the list of ordered Items

    const items = getOrderedItems()
    
  2. Create a variable to hold the nextItem that will be focused/selected

    let nextItem: Item | undefined
    
  3. Find the index of the currently focused item

    const currIndex = items.findIndex(item => item.value === value)
    
  4. If it doesn't exist, set nextItem to be the first item in our ordered list

    if (currIndex === -1) {
        nextItem = items.shift()
    }
    
  5. In the case of right or down keys, set nextItem to be the item positioned at currIndex + 1

    else if {
        nextItem = currIndex === items.length - 1 ? items[0] : items[currIndex + 1]
    }
    
  6. Now we can check if nextItem was set. If it was, focus the related element and onChange with the related value

    if (nextItem) {
        nextItem.element.focus()
        onChange(nextItem.value)
    }
    

Creating the previous button keyboard shortcut

With the next button shortcut in place adding in previous button is quite easy.

    if (currIndex === -1) {
        nextItem = items.shift()
    } else if (isHotkey(['down', 'right'], e)) {
        nextItem = currIndex === items.length - 1 ? items[0] : items[currIndex + 1]
-    }
+    } else if (isHotkey(['up', 'left'], e)) {
+        nextItem = currIndex === 0 ? items[items.length - 1] : items[currIndex - 1]
+    }

Composing keyboard events

Let's also handle any event handlers passed to our Root and Button components. A prop interface is like a contract that the component offers. Since we used ComponentPropsWithoutRef, it's important to compose the event handlers and keep our side of the bargain.

onClick={(e ) => {
+    props.onClick?.(e)
   /* ... */
}}
onKeyDown={(e) => {
+   props.onKeyDown?.(e)
   /* ... */
}}

This will ensure that if someone wants to trigger an event on a specific Button like so:

<Root value={favoriteFruit} onChange={changeFavoriteFruit} aria-label="What is your favorite?">
    <Button onClick={() => throwBanana()} value="two" className="px-2">
        Banana 🍌
    </Button>
    {/* ... */}
</Root>

they won't run into any surprises.

Preventing scroll on up and down arrows

One final thing we need to do is prevent the default scroll on the up and down keys. preventDefault is perfect for doing just that.

    <button
        onKeyDown={(e) => {
            props.onKeyDown?.(e)
+            if (isHotkey(['up', 'down'])) {
+                e.preventDefault()
+            }
            const items = getOrderedItems()
            let nextItem: Item | undefined

            /* ... */

Here is a look at our component so far:

import { useState } from "react";

import { ToggleGroup } from "./toggle-group"

export default function App() {
    const [favoriteFruit, changeFavoriteFruit] = useState<string | null>("banana")

    return (
        <div className="flex flex-col space-y-10 h-screen justify-center items-center">
            <button className="text-white bg-[rgb(171,135,255)] px-2 py-1 rounded-md">focusable element</button>
            <ToggleGroup.Root
                value={favoriteFruit}
                onChange={changeFavoriteFruit}
                aria-label="What is your favorite fruit?"
            >
                <ToggleGroup.Button value="strawberry" className="px-2">
                    Strawberry 🍓
                </ToggleGroup.Button>
                <ToggleGroup.Button value="banana" className="px-2">
                    Banana 🍌
                </ToggleGroup.Button>
                <ToggleGroup.Button value="apple" className="px-2">
                    Apple 🍏
                </ToggleGroup.Button>
            </ToggleGroup.Root>
            <button className="text-white bg-[rgb(171,135,255)] px-2 py-1 rounded-md">focusable element</button>
        </div>
    )
}

Despite being able to move the selection with the arrow keys, our toggle group isn't behaving as one unit yet. If Strawberry is focused — and I hit tab — the focus should move through the other buttons and to the next interactive element.

A roving tabindex will help us accomplish that behavior.

Roving tabindex concepts

Before we jump into implementation let's cover some basics.

What is a tabindex?

  • A tabindex is a HTML attribute that allows you to control whether something is focusable or not.
  • A tabindex of 0 means that this element should appear in the normal tab order.
  • A tabindex of -1 means that this element shouldn't be in the tab order.
  • A tabindex of greater than 0 allows you to manually set the tab order. (this is considered bad practice)

What is a roving tabindex?

A roving tabindex is a technique for controlling focus.

In a native radio group, your selection and focus are saved as you tab to and from the component.

With keyboard shortcuts alone we still don't get this type of experience in our toggle group. When Apple 🍏 is selected, shift+tab moves back to Banana 🍌 — the previous element in the tab order.

We need a solution that takes elements out of the tab order so that no extra tabbing is needed. We need a solution that toggles tabindex from -1 to 0 and back again based on whether the element is currently focused.

This kind of focus control is called a roving tabindex.

Roving tabindex implementation

I'll be implementing this roving tabindex in three stages

  1. Tracking and toggling tabindex
  2. Handling tab when initial value is null
  3. Handling shift+tab when Root is focusable

Tracking and toggling tabindex

Let's create some state for which value is focused in our Root component and pass it via context.

function Root({ value, onChange, children, ...props }: RootProps) {
+    const [focusedValue, setFocusedValue] = useState<string | null>(value)

    const providerValue = useMemo(
        () => ({
+            setFocusedValue: function (id: string) {
+                setFocusedValue(id)
+            },
+            focusedValue,
        }),
-        [getOrderedItems, onChange, value],
+        [focusedValue, getOrderedItems, onChange, value],
    )

I could pass along the setter from useState, but I am wrapping it to simplify the type of setFocusedValue in my context. The fact that I'm using useState is an implementation detail that I don't want as part of the contract between the Root and my Buttons.

Back in our Button:

function Button({ children, value, className, ...props }: ToggleGroupButtonProps) {
    const {
        /* ... */
+        focusedValue,
+        setFocusedValue,
    } = useContext(ToggleGroupContext)

    return (
        <button
+            tabIndex={focusedValue === value ? 0 : -1}
            onClick={(e) => {
+                e.currentTarget.focus()
                onChange(value)
            }}
+            onFocus={(e) => {
+                setFocusedValue(value)
+            }}
            {/* ... */}
        >
            {children}
        </button>
    )
}
  1. We create anonFocus to update the focusedValue

    onFocus={(e) => {
        setFocusedValue(value)
    }}
    
  2. We toggle tabindex based on whether this Button's value is currently focused

    tabIndex={focusedValue === value ? 0 : -1}
    
  3. Finally, since Safari doesn't trigger focus onClick we can force this interaction by .focus()ing the currentTarget.

    e.currentTarget.focus()
    

Handling tab when initial value is null

Our implementation has an edge case. If the initial value of our toggle group is null then no Buttons are focusable. According to our spec, when the value is null and our component receives focus the first element should be focused.

Let's make our Root focusable (tabindex={0}), and its onFocus can pass focus to the first Button.

function Root({ value, onChange, children, ...props }: RootProps) {
    /* ... */
    return (
        <ToggleGroupContext.Provider value={providerValue}>
            <div
                tabIndex={0}
+                onFocus={() => {
+                    if (e.target !== e.currentTarget) return
+                    const orderedItems = getOrderedItems()
+
+                    if (value) {
+                        elements.current.get(value)?.focus()
+                    } else {
+                        orderedItems.at(0)?.element.focus()
+                    }
+                }}
                ref={ref}
                {...props}
            >
                {children}
            </div>
        </ToggleGroupContext.Provider>
    )
}
  1. First we check that the focus is coming from the wrapper element — not one of its children.

    if (e.target !== e.currentTarget) return
    

    This means that we don't run this logic on focus events that bubble up from our Button. We could also e.stopPropagation in our Button but that is much more intrusive than just checking the source where we need it.

  2. We then reuse the getOrderedItems to easily find the first element in the list

  3. If the toggle group has value set - focus the related element

    if (value) {
        elements.current.get(value)?.focus()
    }
    
  4. Otherwise focus the first element

    else {
        orderedItems.at(0)?.element.focus()
    }
    

Handling shift+tab when Root is focusable

Unfortunately, making the Root focusable breaks shift+tab.

That's because our Root element receives focus and places it back on the child.

We can fix this by toggling the tabindex of our Root between the onKeyDown of our Button and the onBlur of our Root

  1. In the Root we can create some state for representing when the user presses shift+tab

    function Root({ value, onChange, children, ...props }: RootProps) {
    +    const [isShiftTabbing, setIsShiftTabbing] = useState(false)
    
    
        const providerValue = useMemo(
            () => ({
    +            onShiftTab: function () {
    +                setIsShiftTabbing(true)
    +            },
            }),
            [/*...*/],
        )
    
  2. This state can then toggle the Root out of the tab order

        return (
            <ToggleGroupContext.Provider value={providerValue}>
                <div
    -                tabIndex={0}
    +                tabIndex={isShiftTabbing ? -1 : 0}
                >
    }
    
  3. In our Button we can then set this value in the onKeyDown of shift+tab

    return (
        <button
            onKeyDown={(e) => {
    +           if (isHotkey('shift+tab', e)) {
    +                onShiftTab()
    +           }
                /* ... */
    
  4. This toggles our tabIndex value to -1 in the Root, and our focus leaves the ToggleGroup all together

  5. The onBlur of our Button occurs, bubbles up to the Root, and there we can reset our Root's tabIndex state

        return (
            <ToggleGroupContext.Provider value={providerValue}>
                <div
                    tabIndex={isShiftTabbing ? -1 : 0}
    +                onBlur={() => setIsShiftTabbing(false)}
                >
    }
    

With that — we have a roving tabindex 🛻💨

import { useState } from "react";

import { ToggleGroup } from "./toggle-group"

export default function App() {
    const [favoriteFruit, changeFavoriteFruit] = useState<string | null>("banana")

    return (
        <div className="flex flex-col space-y-10 h-screen justify-center items-center">
            <button className="text-white bg-[rgb(171,135,255)] px-2 py-1 rounded-md">focusable element</button>
            <ToggleGroup.Root
                value={favoriteFruit}
                onChange={changeFavoriteFruit}
                aria-label="What is your favorite fruit?"
            >
                <ToggleGroup.Button value="strawberry" className="px-2">
                    Strawberry 🍓
                </ToggleGroup.Button>
                <ToggleGroup.Button value="banana" className="px-2">
                    Banana 🍌
                </ToggleGroup.Button>
                <ToggleGroup.Button value="apple" className="px-2">
                    Apple 🍏
                </ToggleGroup.Button>
            </ToggleGroup.Root>
            <button className="text-white bg-[rgb(171,135,255)] px-2 py-1 rounded-md">focusable element</button>
        </div>
    )
}

Aria attributes

The pattern for this component is already well defined. I recommend reading it yourself if you are implementing this component, but in the following two sections, I'll detail the changes required to make our component accessible.

Root

The Root needs a role="radiogroup".

    return (
        <ToggleGroupContext.Provider value={providerValue}>
            <div
+               role="radiogroup"

And we also need a way to enforce either a aria-label or aria-labelledby.

+   type PropsWithLabelBy = {
+       ['aria-labelledby']: string
+   }

+    type PropsWithLabel = {
+        ['aria-label']: string
+    }

-    type RootProps =
+    type RootProps = (PropsWithLabel | PropsWithLabelBy) &
        RootBaseProps &
        Omit<ComponentPropsWithoutRef<'div'>, keyof RootBaseProps>
  • I created a Union (|) type of two different methods of labeling a radiogroup
  • I then created an Intersection (&) type of our label props with our existing props

This will alert the developer that they haven't specified an aria-label or an aria-labeledby.

Button

For the Button, we can add the correct role="radio" and an aria-checked with the selectedValue from context.

return (
    <button
+        role="radio"
+        aria-checked={selectedValue === value}

These properties provide context for all users to navigate our component. Here is one last look:

import { useState } from "react";

import { ToggleGroup } from "./toggle-group"

export default function App() {
    const [favoriteFruit, changeFavoriteFruit] = useState<string | null>("banana")

    return (
        <div className="flex h-screen justify-center items-center">
            <ToggleGroup.Root
                value={favoriteFruit}
                onChange={changeFavoriteFruit}
                aria-label="What is your favorite fruit?"
            >
                <ToggleGroup.Button value="strawberry" className="px-2">
                    Strawberry 🍓
                </ToggleGroup.Button>
                <ToggleGroup.Button value="banana" className="px-2">
                    Banana 🍌
                </ToggleGroup.Button>
                <ToggleGroup.Button value="apple" className="px-2">
                    Apple 🍏
                </ToggleGroup.Button>
            </ToggleGroup.Root>
        </div>
    )
}

That's a wrap on this component. But there is a bunch more to come ⚡

I still have a lot to learn about components and my plan for this year is to learn and document as much about React components as I can. The "hub" for that work can be found here and more examples of this component can be found here.

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